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Best 25 MPH Electric Scooters – I Tested 12 Models & Selected 5

Quick List: Best 25 MPH Electric Scooters

Following my hands-on performance tests of 12 electric scooters that claimed to reach speeds of up to 25 mph, I selected the 5 top performers.

Key to my decision was each scooter’s motor power, nominal and peak power, top speed, acceleration, controller performance, handling, and braking.

Learn more about how I tested and selected the scooters.

Top Picks:

SPLACH Turbo Frame
Best Under $700
SPLACH Turbo
Sale: $699.00 $1,299.00 – Get Extra $65 Off With Code: ESI
Horizon V2 Frame
Best Under $800
Horizon 10.4 V2
Sale: $719.00 $899.00
EMOVE Touring Frame
Best Under $900
EMOVE Touring
Sale: $799.00 $899.00 – Get Extra $50 Off With Code: ELECTRICSCOOTERINSIDER
Side Profile of Mosquito Frame
Best Under $1,000
Mosquito
Sale: $899.00 $1,099.00
Apollo Go Unfolded
Best Under $1,200
Apollo Go
Sale: $1,199.00 $1,299.00

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Heavy Duty Electric Scooters for Heavy Adults

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Electric Scooters For Tall Riders Up to 6ft 6″

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Fastest Electric Scooters

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Long Range Electric Scooters

  • Mosquito – 29 lbs, telescopic stem, and foldable handlebars

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Best Foldable Electric Scooters (Portable, Compact & Small)

  • Apollo Go – Front spring and rear rubber block (score 6/10 on my shock absorption scale)

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Best Electric Scooters With Suspension

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Big Wheel Electric Scooters

Best Under $700

SPLACH Turbo

Sale: $699.00 $1,299.00 – Get Extra $65 Off With Code: ESI

Performance Report:

Tester: Josh Frisby (190 lbs, 6.1 ft)

*Based on my tests and assessments

Motor Power:

SPLACH Turbo Overview:

SPLACH is a brand that likes to march to the beat of its own drum. This is an approach that yields singularly impressive results, as demonstrated by the refreshed Turbo.

Josh Testing the SPLACH Turbo

Building on 2020’s original model, it boasts best-in-class power, outstanding ride quality, and a reassuringly low-maintenance design. But that’s not all, it now comes with a couple of nifty upgrades that up the ante in the security and safety stakes.

Best of all, though, is the fact that all of this costs less than $700. To put it simply, it’s one of the best value electric scooters that I’ve ever tested.

Josh Standing on the SPLACH Turbo

The Good:

The Bad:

Why I Recommend the SPLACH Turbo:

If it’s a plucky everyday scooter with enough zip to get your heart pumping, then look no further. The Turbo’s 48V 600W motor summons a peak power output of 800W and a manufacturer-claimed top speed of 28 mph.

Josh Testing the SPLACH Turbo

Under my tests, however, I was only able to squeeze out 26 mph. Yet, despite not hitting its maximum, it managed to top the charts when I compared its performance against 14 comparable models.

Josh Cruising on the SPLACH Turbo

I also experienced its chart-topping pace when testing its acceleration. Armed with a 25A controller and a responsive trigger throttle, the Turbo zoomed from 0-15 mph in just 4.3 seconds. It was even faster than the pricier Horizon, EMOVE Touring, and Mosquito. I put this down to the fact that its controller and 10.4Ah battery operate at a higher voltage (52V vs 48V). This facilitates a higher output of power, resulting in greater torque.

SPLACH Turbo Durable Chassis

With this power comes the need for strong brakes. Yet again, the Turbo impressed me. Its dual drums – which are yet another rare feature that it only shares with the Ranger in the sub-$700 class – brought me to a sharp and responsive stop from 15 mph in just 2.4 meters. This beats many pricier models.

SPLACH Turbo Brake

As for range, SPLACH claims that the 541Wh of stored energy will keep the wheels rolling for up to 22 miles. As per my tests, however – which saw me go heavy on the throttle, cruise, and make multiple stops – I achieved 18 miles. Among the rest of the scooters that I tested and selected for this list, there was no discernible difference in real-world range so this shouldn’t weigh heavily in your decision.

Josh Riding the SPLACH Turbo

One area of its performance that you should consider is its ride quality. Finding a sub-$700 scooter that comes equipped with adjustable springs and deep-traveling swingarms is vanishingly rare – in fact, the only other scooter you’ll find with this setup is the SPLACH Ranger. Paired with the Turbo’s front pneumatic tire, the suspension absorbs the majority of shocks thrown up by city streets.

SPLACH Turbo Suspension

Good shock absorption isn’t the only ingredient necessary for a satisfying ride, though.
Thankfully, SPLACH is acutely aware of this: the 10-degree rake angle of the stem, for one, is perfect for maximizing your stability at high speeds. As for handling, an even distribution of weight across the front and rear of the frame makes it easy to maintain control as you accelerate, brake, and corner. The 24-inch wide cockpit, adjustable handlebar height, and well-designed kickplate tick all the boxes for comfort, too.

SPLACH Turbo Handlebars

Then we have the Turbo’s low-maintenance appeal. The last thing you want from an everyday scooter is fragility, so you’ll be glad to hear there’s not even a whiff of it here. Thanks to an IPX5 water resistance rating, it can handle light rain and puddle splashes with minimal fuss. Elsewhere, the solid rear tire significantly reduces the risk of dreaded punctures, while the cable management is neat.

SPLACH Turbo Chassis From Rear

Elsewhere, the Turbo promises a couple of new features. The first is an NFC card reader. With this, you have to use a pre-programmed security card to unlock the scooter (you get 3).

SPLACH Turbo NFC Card

The second is a set of turn signals that flash at the rear of the deck. They also function as taillights and flash red when you brake.

SPLACH Turbo Lights at Night

So far, so good in the lighting department. Yet, SPLACH dropped the ball by jettisoning a high-mounted headlight in favor of a strip light on the stem. Though it looks cool, it doesn’t illuminate enough of the road ahead. I recommend attaching an extra clip-on headlight to ensure your safety.

SPLACH Turbo Lights

It would be churlish of me to penalize the Turbo too heavily on this flaw, however, since its strengths far outweigh its weaknesses. Quick, fun, portable, and practical, it has everything you could want in a reliable everyday scooter.

SPLACH Turbo Frame

Further Information:

SPLACH Turbo Review

Best Under $800

Horizon V2 (10.4Ah)

Sale: $719.00 $899.00

Performance Report:

Tester: Josh Frisby (190 lbs, 6.1 ft)

*Based on my tests and assessments

Motor Power:

Horizon Overview:

The priority for most riders when mulling over which model is best for them is value for money. They want a scooter that’s low maintenance, comfortable to ride, and robust enough to handle everyday use.

Josh Testing the Horizon V2 in the Rain

Well, value is the Horizon V2’s calling card. Harnessing the satisfying simplicity and versatility of its predecessor, the V2 achieves best-in-class ride quality, speed, mileage, and hill-climbing.

It’s also one of the cheapest scooters to be equipped with a full suspension system, qualifying it as a smooth, comfortable ride for urban jaunts.

Indeed, this award-winning model is in a league of its own when compared to other scooters in its price category.

Horizon V2 Sleek Chassis

The Good:

The Bad:

Why I Recommend the Horizon:

This is a scooter that’s been purpose-built to meet the needs of first-time riders who want a zippy, comfortable, and compact model.

Horizon V2 Being Carried

Its secret weapons are a 48V 500W motor and 20A controller that together produce a peak power output of 800W and an acceleration rate of 0-15 mph in 4.7 seconds. This repertoire is exceptionally rare on scooters priced under $800; in fact, you’ll find the V2 outpacing models approaching the $1,000 mark. Think of it as a welterweight punching at middleweight.

Horizon V2 Being Ridden

But a one-trick pony, the V2 is not. Despite its relatively low price tag, it comes equipped with a sublime front and rear suspension system.

The dual-pronged rear springs act as counterbalances to the V2’s solid tire, the presence of which is designed to reduce the likelihood of flats (rear tires are more prone to punctures). The front spring and air-filled tire, meanwhile, work in harmony to absorb shocks from city streets. As a result, the V2 is one of the most comfortable rides that I've tested in its price category.

Horizon V2 Rear Suspension

This comfort is amplified by the reasonably spacious and grippy deck, handlebars that are 41% wider than your typical entry-level scooter, and an ergonomic cockpit that includes a serenely smooth – and newly upgraded – thumb throttle. These features, along with its well-balanced frame, establish the Horizon V2 as a veritable joyride.

Horizon V2 Handgrip

Also present is a revamped display that comes with an IP66 water resistance rating. What’s peculiar, however, is that the rest of the scooter has no rating whatsoever. While testing the Horizon it survived snow and rain, but I’d avoid taking it out in heavy downpours.

Josh Riding the Horizon in the Rain

Now, being the archetypal everyday scooter, you’d expect it to have its portability game in order. I’m pleased to confirm that it meets such expectations. Not only is its cantilevered folding mechanism a celebration of ease and convenience, but the handlebars are also foldable and the wobble-free stem is telescopic. It easily fits onto public transport or in the trunk of a car when folded, while its 42 lbs weight means it can be carried in short bursts with little hassle. It even comes with a new carry handle.

Horizon V2 Folded Handlebars

Yet, with a maximum range of 23 miles, carrying the V2 will be an afterthought. Even with real-world conditions factored in, you can still expect 17 miles on a single charge (based on my tests). And better still, for an extra $80 you can purchase the scooter with a larger 13Ah battery to boost your range to 30 miles.

Horizon V2 Front Tire

A model capable of 23 mph requires the stopping power to match. Well, one of my biggest bugbears with the original Horizon was its lackluster performance in this area – and sadly, there have been no improvements made on the V2. Though the rear drum and regen brake combo are low maintenance, their combined stopping distance of 5.0 meters from 15 mph is average at best. It does, however, align with the same performance as exhibited by the EMOVE Touring and Mosquito, thereby making it easier to accept.

Horizon V2 Drum Brake

Its array of lights also left me a little lukewarm. There are plenty of them, but are they bright enough for night rides? To put it simply, you’ll need to buy extras. The headlight is mounted too low on the stem leaving the street ahead shrouded in more darkness than I would have liked. The deck-embedded button lights, on the other hand, illuminate the scooter to signal your presence to other road users. The ones at the rear double up as brake lights, too.

Horizon V2 Lights

But, let’s shift the dial back to positivity because the Horizon V2 has so much to brag about. Tough as a rhino, as comfortable as a magic carpet, and surprisingly powerful, few scooters can offer such a bounty of treats at such an affordable price tag.

Josh Standing on Horizon V2

Further Information:

Horizon V2 Review

Best Under $900

EMOVE Touring

Sale: $799.00 $899.00 – Get Extra $50 Off With Code: ELECTRICSCOOTERINSIDER

Performance Report:

Tester: Josh Frisby (190 lbs, 6.1 ft)

*Based on my tests and assessments

Motor Power:

EMOVE Touring Overview:

There’s one simple reason why the EMOVE Touring has become a stalwart of the commuter scene over the last few years: it’s a top-class scooter with inclusivity at its heart.

Josh Testing the EMOVE Touring

So, what’s its secret? Well, not only is it a little bottle rocket capable of a 25 mph top speed, but with a high-end LG battery, humongous 308 lbs load capacity, ultra-portable features, and the option of a detachable seat, it pretty much covers all bases when talking about mass appeal.

It may not be the most graceful scooter around – and other models may beat it in certain areas. But the EMOVE Touring’s all-around excellence means it isn’t going anywhere despite innumerable newcomers seeking to dethrone it.

Josh Standing on the EMOVE Touring

The Good:

The Bad:

Why I Recommend the EMOVE Touring:

Being a member of the EMOVE clan bestows a certain gravitas. These are scooters that are renowned for their durability, range, and suitability for all rider types. But they’re also plucky, as demonstrated by the Touring.

EMOVE Touring Motor

Its rear-mounted 48V 500W motor has a peak power output of 750W and a fizzing top speed of 25 mph, making it a top contender for the fastest sub 40 lb scooter.

EMOVE Touring Front Wheel

I experienced this first-hand when its Square Wave controller and responsive finger throttle propelled me to 15 mph in 4.5 seconds – leaving the majority of its similarly-priced rivals in the dust.

EMOVE Touring Display

It’s fair to say, then, that this is a scooter that’ll add considerable spice to your commute. Yet, I’m not talking about the kind of spice that leaves you desperately grasping for water while your eyes stream and your mouth teeters on the brink of spontaneous combustion.

EMOVE Touring From Rear

No. The Touring is a model that ensures that you always feel in control. Its expansive grippy deck, flared handgrips, and exceptionally wide handlebars maximize your sense of balance and stability, while a coterie of riding modes can be accessed via the bright display.

EMOVE Touring Deck

Elsewhere, the IP54 water-resistant frame is tough enough to support a best-in-class load-bearing capacity of 308 lbs. And, there’s even space at the rear of the deck for an optional seat attachment. Talk about comfort.

EMOVE Touring Kickstand

Comfort is also an apt description for the triple suspension system. While not quite as ground-breaking as it was back in 2020 when the Touring was released, it remains a reliable absorber of the shocks and vibrations that you’ll encounter on urban routes. Sure, things can get a bit lively when you go over bumps, but not excessively so.

EMOVE Touring Suspension

A pneumatic tire at the front pulls its weight to maximize your riding experience, while a solid tire at the rear significantly reduces the risk of punctures. Additionally, because it sports a slightly wider profile and larger contact patch, the rear tire guarantees a healthy amount of traction when you’re accelerating.

EMOVE Touring Rear Motor

Like many scooters in its price category, the Touring brandishes an extremely low-maintenance drum brake. Working in cahoots with the accompanying regen brake, it’ll bring you to a stop from 15 mph in 4.9 meters. This isn’t anything to write home about, though it is in line with its greatest rivals – the Horizon and Mosquito.

EMOVE Touring Drum Brake

When it comes to portability, however, it shines. Weighing a paltry 39 lbs, it's exceptionally light and easy to carry. The triumvirate of a telescopic stem, foldable handlebars, and slick folding mechanism ensures that it can be collapsed to a compact size that’ll fit snugly under your desk or in your car trunk.

EMOVE Touring Being Lifted

With so many highlights to get through, it’s little wonder that I’m only now arriving at one of the Touring’s greatest strengths: range. Armed with a top-tier 48V 13Ah LG battery, it can work through a maximum of 32 miles on a single charge – or 19 miles when you bring higher speeds and heavier riders into the equation. This is still more than enough juice for the vast majority of commutes… and then some.

Josh Riding the EMOVE Touring While It's Snowing

As is the case with many entry-level scooters, the Touring’s headlight doesn’t quite hit the mark. It’s a little too low on the stem, meaning you’ll need to invest in an extra one to ensure enough of the road ahead is illuminated. Saying that, it does a much better job than the Horizon by providing a good level of visibility in low-light conditions. Elsewhere, the lighting rig is completed by deck LEDS and a taillight, which is what you’d expect for its price.

EMOVE Touring Lights at Night

In truth, expectations are something that this model specializes in exceeding. Though it may be an elder statesman in electric scooter terms, the Touring shows no signs of relinquishing its grip on rider affections.

EMOVE Touring Handlebars

Further Information:

EMOVE Touring Review

Best Under $1,000

Mosquito

Sale: $899.00 $1,099.00

Performance Report:

Tester: Josh Frisby (190 lbs, 6.1 ft)

*Based on my tests and assessments

Motor Power:

Mosquito Overview:

Fluid’s Mosquito is that rare breed of scooter that marries ultra-portability with nippy power and rugged durability. No wonder it’s a winner of one of my ESI Awards for 2023/24.

Josh Testing the Mosquito

In fact, when it comes to its power-to-weight ratio, no other scooter touches it. Weighing about the same as a small sausage dog (29 lbs), but capable of hitting speeds faster than Usain Bolt, the Mosquito channels the flitting nimbleness of its fearsome namesake to deliver a truly unique ride.

Factor in a superb suspension setup, mighty brakes, and an exceptionally low maintenance design, and you have a scooter that’s purpose-made for the unpredictability of city life.

Mosquito Chassis

The Good:

The Bad:

Why I Recommend the Mosquito:

The Mosquito’s 48V 500W motor produces a peak power output of 700W and a top speed of 25 mph (though, some riders have reported speeds of 28 mph). What’s more, it can go from 0-15 mph in an impressive 5.0 seconds (based on my tests).

Mosquito 500W motor

In simple terms, no other scooter can lay a glove on the Mosquito when it comes to speed versus weight. You could say it’s punching above its… you get the idea.

None of them can match it for ultra-portability, either. The Mosquito’s super lightweight 29 lb frame can easily be lifted and carried, while its foldable handlebars, telescopic stem, and cantilevered folding mechanism ensure it’ll fit in even the tightest of storage spaces. It’s the most portable scooter on the market, bar none.

Mosquito Folded With Carry Handle

And then you have its ride quality. Despite featuring solid tires (which, to be fair, turn the threat of flats into a myth), the dual-spring suspension admirably absorbs shocks and vibrations to spare your muscles and joints from any duress. At the risk of sounding like a broken record, the Mosquito has no peers in the ultra-portability arena when it comes to comfort.

Mosquito Rear Spring

This comfort is further enhanced by the spacious – not to mention grippy – deck, and smooth thumb throttle. However, I did find the handlebars to be on the narrow side; they take some getting used to but feel stable enough once you’ve acclimatized.

Mosquito Handlebars

And fear not, if you count yourself as a bigger rider and are concerned as to whether the Mosquito’s compact profile will be a good fit for you, you can rest assured thanks to its 265 lbs load-bearing capacity.

Mosquito Deck

As for range, it continues to turn heads. Its 48V 9.6Ah battery can summon a maximum of 22 miles on a single charge, or 18 miles when ridden fast. Only the INOKIM Light 2 can eclipse it in the mileage versus weight stakes. But, the Light 2 is void of a suspension system, making the Mosquito a more well-rounded and comfortable scooter.

Side Profile of Mosquito Frame

Considering the Mosquito’s pocket rocket performance profile, you’ll be glad to hear that also has a triple braking system. The main protagonist is a rear drum brake, which is ably supported by a regen and stomp brake. Together, they’ll bring you to a stop from 15 mph in 4.8 meters. My one bit of advice, however, would be to go easy on the stomp, as it can wear down the rear tire if overused.

Mosquito Brake Lever

Elsewhere, the cockpit is a case study in ergonomic design. Paddles for your accelerator and regen brake are within easy reach, while the bright LED color display grants easy access to all your key stats. And there’s more: through the display you can also tap into the scooter’s p-settings, allowing you to turn cruise control on or off, and activate zero-start mode.

Mosquito Display Showing Key Stats

Below the display, there’s a series of four buttons – one of which controls the lights. As is the case with the vast majority of entry-level scooters, I recommend buying an extra clip-on headlight. But, even without this addition, the built-in headlight is sufficiently bright to illuminate dimly-lit paths. The fender-embedded taillight doubles as a flashing brake light, too.

Mosquito Frame With Lights On

In conclusion, if you’re searching for a fast yet agile, low-maintenance yet sleek, and ultra-portable yet comfortable scooter, then there’s only one contender: the Mosquito.

Mosquito Front Tire Tread

Further Information:

Mosquito Review

Best Under $1,200

Apollo Go

Sale: $1,199.00 $1,299.00

Performance Report:

Tester: Josh Frisby (197 lbs, 6.1 ft)

*Based on my tests and assessments

Motor Power:

Apollo Go Overview:

The release of the Apollo Go has left rival scooters in the entry-level category tearing their hair out. Why? Here are four reasons: its suite of industry-leading features, well-rounded performance profile, premium cybertruck-esque design, and low-maintenance build. Rarely do you find all four in one package.

Josh Testing the Apollo Go

The Go takes the best elements from its costlier siblings – the City and Pro – and melds them into an affordable format. This means you get dual 350W motors, a QuadLock phone mount and bright DOT Matrix display, an integrated mobile app, juicy self-healing tires, an ergonomic cockpit, a regenerative braking system, handlebar-integrated turn signals, and an IP66 water resistance rating.

Josh Testing the Apollo Go's Load-Bearing Capacity

The Good:

The Bad:

Why I Recommend the Apollo Go:

Let’s start with the performance metric that qualifies the Apollo Go for inclusion in this guide: its 28 mph top speed.

Josh Testing the Apollo Go's Ride Quality

Brandishing dual 36V 350W motors that deliver a peak power output of 1500W, it’s an affordable scooter with some serious bite. It’s worth noting, however, that my tests revealed its true top speed to be 25.5 mph. While Apollo’s claimed speed may be possible, the conditions need to be perfect.

Apollo Go Top Speed Test Data From High-Precision GPS Data Logger

Still, this is ample chutzpah for most commuting and recreational needs. Propelled by a smooth controller and responsive thumb throttle, it wastes no time hitting its stride, either. I reached 15 mph in a cool 3.8 seconds, making it the quickest off the line among all the scooters in this guide.

Josh Testing the Apollo Go's Handling Around a Corner

While this may sound like a daunting amount of power for first-timers, the Go’s design is engineered to keep a tight rein on proceedings. Sure, at 20.4 inches, the handlebars are a little narrow, yet elsewhere, it hits all the right notes.

Apollo Go Cockpit

Its 14-degree rake angle, for example – which is the most pronounced that I’ve measured – ensures optimal stability and maneuverability. Its upswept deck, tall stem, and ergonomic cockpit, meanwhile, have been tailor-made for a balanced, comfortable ride – something that’s crucial when emptying its 36V 15Ah battery (I got 17.6 miles from it).

Apollo Go Deck

The cockpit, in particular, is a thing of beauty. Borrowing the same 8th-generation paddles for the regenerative brake and accelerator that I previously tested on the City and Pro, it affords unparalleled ease of access to all your main controls. The buttons for your riding modes and turn signals are built into the paddles, too, which have been angled down to improve their user-friendliness.

Apollo Go Regen Brake

Between the paddles, you’ll find the same DOT Matrix display that wowed me on the Pro. Unlike other displays, the digits on the screen do not get washed out in direct sunlight. Better yet, a complementary QuadLock phone case accessory grants you the option of using your phone as an alternative display. I attached it to my case and it worked a treat:

Josh's Phone With the Apollo Go QuadLock Attachment

This may be an attractive option if you want to tap into the full potential of the Go’s integrated mobile app. This allows you to adjust the regenerative braking and accelerative strength, access GPS navigation, record rides, get range estimates based on your most recent riding pattern, view the health of your battery, switch between kick-to-start and zero-start modes, turn the headlight on/off, and activate the digital lock.

Josh Testing the Apollo Go Mobile App

Among other highlights are a simple-to-use folding mechanism, 360-degree lighting rig, and dual suspension system.

Apollo Go Bright Lights

Here, its front spring and rear rubber block combine with the plush pneumatic tires to absorb vibrations from the road. It felt very similar to the setup of the Horizon V2, but the Go edged it as a result of its slightly softer ride. Plus, the tires are self-healing so you can wave goodbye to flats.

Apollo Go Front Spring

This low-maintenance charm is further exemplified by its IP66 water resistance rating. For context, only a handful of scooters – regardless of price – can claim such a rating. It guarantees protection against high-pressure jets and is completely dust-tight.

Apollo Go Folded

The braking setup is another high watermark. The regen brakes alone brought me to a stop from 15 mph in 7.8 meters, while the mechanical drum shortened this to 3.1 meters.

Apollo Go Brake Lever

With everything considered it’s easy to see why I chose the Apollo Go as one of my top picks. Its entire existence is predicated on providing blue ribbon features at an affordable price.

Apollo Go Kickplate

Further Information:

Apollo Go Review

Comparison

Compare 25 MPH Electric Scooters

The table below compares the electric scooters across motor power, top speed, acceleration, performance, specs, price, and more.
Scroll right to see more
SPLACH TurboSPLACH TurboHorizon 10.4 V2HorizonEMOVE TouringEMOVE TouringMosquitoMosquitoApollo GoApollo Go
Where to BuySPLACHFluid Free RideVoro MotorsFluid Free RideApollo
Price$699$719$799$899$1,199
AwardBest Under $700Best Under $800Best Under $900Best Under $1,000Under $1,200
ReviewReviewReviewReviewReviewReview
Performance
Top Speed28 mph23 mph25 mph25 mph28 mph
0-15 MPH4.3 s4.7 s4.5 s5.0 s3.8 s
Max Range22 miles23 miles32 miles22 miles30 miles
Tested Range18 miles17 miles19 miles18 miles17.6 miles
Braking2.4 meters5.0 meters4.9 meters4.8 meters3.1 meters
Shock Absorp.6/106/105/105.5/106/10
Max Incline14 degrees15 degrees15 degrees15 degrees25 degrees
Optimal Incline9 degrees9 degrees9 degrees9 degrees12 degrees
Specs
Motor48V 600W48V 500W48V 500W48V 500W36V 350W (x2)
Nominal Power600W500W500W500W700W
Peak Power800W800W750W700W1500W
ThrottleFingerThumbFingerThumbThumb
Battery52V 10.4Ah FST48V 10.4Ah FST48V 13Ah LG48V 9.6Ah FST36V 15Ah FST
Charge Time7 hours6 hours8 hours6 hours7.5 hours
BrakesDual drums, ElectronicDrum, ElectronicDrum, ElectronicDrum, ElectronicDrum, Regen
SuspensionSprings, SwingarmsSprings, Air ShocksSprings, SwingarmsSprings, SwingarmsSpring, Rubber Block
Tire Size8.5 inches8 inch8 inch8 inch9 inch
Tire TypeAir (Inner-Tube), Solid (Rubber)Air (Inner-Tube), Solid (Rubber)Air (Inner-Tube), Solid (Rubber)Solid (Rubber)Air (Tubeless, Self-Healing)
Weight45 lbs42 lbs39 lbs29 lbs46 lbs
Load265 lbs265 lbs308 lbs265 lbs265 lbs
FoldabilityFolds at Stem & HandlebarsFolds at Stem & HandlebarsFolds at Stem & HandlebarsFolds at Stem & HandlebarsFolds at Stem
LightsStem Strip, Deck LEDs, Taillights, Turn SignalsHeadlight, TaillightHeadlight, TaillightHeadlight, TaillightHeadlight, Taillight, Turn Signals
IP RatingIPX5NoneIP54IPX5IP66
TerrainStreetStreetStreetStreetStreet
Testing & Analysis

How Did I Test the Scooters?

Following my hands-on performance tests of 12 electric scooters that claimed to reach speeds of up to 25 mph, I selected the 5 top performers.

Key to my decision was each scooter’s motor power, nominal and peak power, top speed, acceleration, controller performance, handling, and braking.

These assessments were conducted in addition to the standardized tests that I complete as part of my thorough testing process. Learn more about how I test scooters below:

Electric Scooters That I Tested:

Click through the photo carousel to see all of the scooters that I tested for this guide.

Test Criteria:

Motor Power

Aside from testing each scooter’s top speed (which I’ll cover shortly), I also reported on the size and power of their motors.

Horizon V2 Being Ridden

Here, I compared voltage and watts. Voltage indicated the intensity at which electricity was being pushed through the motors, while watts determined the amount of power that the motors could produce. The higher the voltage, the greater the torque and acceleration, and the higher the watts, the greater the top speed.

Based on my tests, scooters with 48V 500W motors were typically able to reach speeds of up to 25 mph.

Nominal & Peak Power

Nominal power refers to the amount of power that a motor can produce continuously. Peak power, meanwhile, refers to the instantaneous injections of energy that a motor is capable of before it overheats.

Josh Riding the SPLACH Turbo

Here, I used my independently gathered data to compare nominal and peak power outputs relative to price (i.e. identifying the scooters with the most powerful outputs per dollar).

Top Speed

To test each scooter’s top speed, I rode them all on a dry, flat road and made sure to have each fully charged with maxed-out performance settings and their tires inflated to the recommended PSI.

To allow for a degree of leniency in the scooter selection process, I expanded the pool to include models that could reach 22-27 mph.

Varla Falcon Chassis in Motion

Further Information:

How I Test Top Speed

Acceleration

To test acceleration, each scooter was subject to 3x two-way 0-15 mph runs. The results from all 6 runs were then averaged.

Josh Riding the Apollo City Pro

To ensure consistency, zero-start modes were enabled, the performance settings were dialed up to the max, the tires were pumped up to their recommended PSI, and the batteries were fully charged.

Further Information:

How I Test Acceleration

Controllers

Controllers are the brain and central nervous system of an electric scooter. They’re responsible for the coordination of how battery power is delivered to the motors, as well as any other component that requires electricity.

60V 40A Sine Wave Controller

Similar to motors, the power of a controller is determined by its amps and voltage. Typically, a higher amperage and voltage resulted in greater torque, faster acceleration rates, and higher top speeds.

Besides this, controllers also play a role in how smoothly power is pulled. To assess this, I reported on the throttle responses of each scooter (i.e. were they smooth or jerky).

Josh Using the Apollo City Pro Throttle

Handling

To assess each scooter’s handling I tested their maneuverability, stability, and comfortability.

Maneuverability was determined by each scooter’s geometry and dimensions. Here, I measured handlebar width, deck-to-handlebar height, usable deck space, and kickplate angles. The wider the bars, the greater the control. The higher the deck-to-handlebar height, the better your posture. The bigger the deck space, the more room there was to find a natural riding stance. And, the shallower the angle of the kickplate, the easier it was to use it as a footrest when leaning into the ride.

NIU KQi3 Pro Wide Handlebars

I also assessed each scooter’s weight distribution and rake angle (i.e. the angle at which the steering columns were positioned in relation to a vertical axis through their front axles). Here, I made sure to select the scooters that I felt distributed their weight evenly across their frames, whilst also having rake angles that hit the sweet spot for speeds of up to 25 mph (i.e. angles that promised both stability and nimbleness).

Josh Testing the Varla Falcon

The last area of assessment was made on each scooter’s ability to soak up shocks. To do this, I tested the rebound and compression rates of their suspension systems, the balance of shock absorption across the front and rear of the scooters, the amount of travel that the springs, shocks, and swingarms provided, and whether there was any bottoming out. All of these insights coalesced into a shock absorption rating out of 10 – where 1 was extremely stiff and 10 was extremely soft.

Josh Riding the Mosquito

Safety

No matter how fast or slow you ride, safety is paramount for electric scooters. Most crucial of all is braking power.

To test each model’s performance, I measured the distance that it took for them to stop from 15 mph. I conducted 5 braking tests per scooter and averaged the data.

Electric Scooter Brakes

If electronic or regenerative braking systems were present then I dialed their strength up to the max. I also assessed the position and responsiveness of the brake levers.

Further Information:

How I Test Braking Performance

Results From My Performance Tests:

See how the electric scooters stack up against each other across the metrics of top speed, acceleration, maximum range, tested range, and braking.

Top Speed

Ordered from fastest to slowest – Learn about how I test top speed.

ScooterPriceTop Speed
Apollo Go
$1,199
28 MPH
SPLACH Turbo
$699
28 MPH
EMOVE Touring
$799
25 MPH
Mosquito
$899
25 MPH
Horizon
$719
23 MPH

Acceleration (0-15 MPH)

Ordered from fastest to slowest – Learn about how I test acceleration.

ScooterPrice0-15 MPH (Seconds)
Apollo Go
$1,199
3.8 s
SPLACH Turbo
$699
4.3 s
EMOVE Touring
$799
4.5 s
Horizon
$719
4.7 s
Mosquito
$899
5.0 s

Maximum Range (Riding Slow)

Ordered from longest to shortest range.

ScooterPriceMax Range
EMOVE Touring
$799
32 miles
Apollo Go
$1,199
30 miles
Horizon
$719
23 miles
Mosquito
$899
22 miles
SPLACH Turbo
$699
22 miles

Realistic Range (Riding Fast)

Ordered from longest to shortest range – Learn about how I test real-world range.

ScooterPriceReal-World Range
SPLACH Turbo
$699
18 miles
EMOVE Touring
$799
19 miles
Mosquito
$899
18 miles
Apollo Go
$1,199
17.6 miles
Horizon
$719
17 miles

Braking (From 15 MPH)

Ordered from shortest to longest stopping distance – Learn about how I test braking performance.

ScooterPriceBraking From 15 MPH
SPLACH Turbo
$699
2.4 meters
Apollo Go
$1,199
3.1 meters
Mosquito
$899
4.8 meters
EMOVE Touring
$799
4.9 meters
Horizon
$719
5.0 meters
25 MPH Electric Scooters
Change Log

Recent Updates

In the interest of delivering the most timely, relevant, and credible reviews/guides in the industry, I have detailed the recent updates and changes to my list of the best 25 mph electric scooters. Learn more about my editorial policy.

Josh Frisby
Josh Frisby

From basic budget and feature-packed commuters to all-terrain trailblazers and ultra-performance behemoths, I've spent the last 5 years testing every type of electric scooter. All of the scooters that I review are put through a rigorous review process so that I can clearly distinguish where one is better or worse than another. See how I test electric scooters or check out my guide to the best electric scooters. Contact me anytime: josh@electricscooterinsider.com

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