- 42% Josh Testing the SPLACH Ranger
SPLACH Ranger Accelerating Josh Riding the SPLACH Ranger SPLACH Ranger NFC Card Reader SPLACH Ranger Drum Brake SPLACH Ranger Folded Frame SPLACH Ranger Lights

SPLACH Ranger Review

$699.00

6/10 (Expert Score)

DATE

September 12, 2023

Price When Reviewed: $699.00

The SPLACH Ranger is a near-identical carbon copy of the SPLACH Turbo. You could call it the yin to the Turbo’s yang. Whereas the latter is geared more towards speed, the former puts its eggs in the range basket.

 

Originally released in 2020, both of these models raised a total of $805k from over 1,000 backers on Indiegogo. Now, in 2023, they’ve been re-released to shake up the market once again. However, while the new Turbo has certainly made its mark, the Ranger hasn’t.

 

Sure, it may sport a suspension system that’s extremely rare to find on a scooter of its price. And yes, it can lay claim to one of the longest mileages in its price class. But, aside from all of its impressive features – which also include a dual drum braking system, NFC card reader, and turn signals – it’s extremely underpowered, making it slow and tedious.

 

Crucially, if you want the best of both worlds – speed and range – as well as all of the Ranger’s features, then you’ll be much better off opting for the SPLACH Turbo Plus.

Discount Code:

Get Extra $65 Off With Code – ESI

SPLACH Ranger Review: Impressive Features, But Underpowered

SPLACH Ranger Frame in Motion

The good and the bad

Who we recommend it for

Is it worth its price tag?

Look, feel, and functionality

Results from our tests

Other scooters to consider

The Good and The Bad

Pros & Cons

PROS:

  • Dual swingarm suspension is rare in its price category
  • Responsive dual drum brakes outperform competitors
  • Exceptionally nimble
  • Compact folded frame
  • Adjustable handlebar height
  • Suitable for tall riders
  • NFC security system to unlock the scooter
  • Low maintenance
  • IPX5 water-resistance rating


CONS:

  • It’s unpowered, making it slow and sluggish
  • Terrible hill climber
  • While the lighting rig looks cool, it doesn’t provide enough illuminate for night rides

Is It Right For You?

Who It's Best For

Much like the SPLACH Turbo, the Ranger has been designed for casual and commuter riders alike.

Josh With the SPLACH Ranger

It combines a smooth suspension system with a long-range, portable frame, and low-maintenance design. However, based on my hands-on tests, the small motor felt as though it was constantly struggling.

As a result, I don’t recommend it to anyone.

SPLACH Ranger Fender

Is It Worth Its Price Tag?

Value For Money

In my extremely positive review of the SPLACH Turbo, I said that it was a worthwhile investment for those with a budget of $700. This statement doesn’t ring true for the Ranger.

SPLACH Ranger Motor

Why? Well, the truth of the matter is that, in sacrificing motor power, SPLACH has tempered the Ranger’s value. It lacks zip and is monotonous to ride, especially for long stints – which is a shame as it’s touted as a long-range model.

For this reason, you’ll be much better off spending an extra $200 and opting for the Turbo Plus. This model combines speed, range, and a plethora of features for an all-around impressive ride that promises great value for money.

SPLACH Ranger Stem

Look, Feel & Functionality

Design & Features

Cockpit

The cockpit is one of the Ranger’s best assets.

Alongside a QS-S4 display that lets you track your speed, distance traveled, and battery level, you also get a newly added NFC security scanner. This stops people from turning the scooter on without a pre-programmed card.

SPLACH Ranger NFC Card Reader

NFC, otherwise known as near-field communication, is the same kind of technology that’s used in fob readers to gain access to offices and apartment blocks. With the Ranger, you get 3 cards, meaning you’ll have spares if you lose one.

Elsewhere, everything is clean, tidy, and within easy reach of your thumbs and fingers. Take for instance the turn signal buttons that have been cleverly embedded into the rubber handgrips.

SPLACH Ranger Handlebars

Alongside the 24-inch grip-to-grip dimensions, the Ranger promises good handling. In fact, it has the widest handlebars in the sub-$700 class, enshrining it with a sense of control that can’t be matched.

Frame

There are no complaints when it comes to the Ranger’s aesthetics. The matte black paint juxtaposes artfully with the streaks of orange that pop across the swingarms, stem, and handlebars.

SPLACH Ranger Black and Orange Frame

Sporting an IPX5 water resistance rating, it also promises durability. It’s sturdy, well-constructed, and built to last.

Deck

Slathered in a grippy coating, the deck ensures that your feet remain glued to the platform. The available space, meanwhile, measures 18.0 x 5.9 inches with the kickplate adding a further 5 inches.

SPLACH Ranger Deck

Add to this the shallow 17-degree angle of the kickplate, and you have a scooter that’s comfortable to ride.

The only area of its design that you need to be mindful of is its ground clearance. With just 5.1 inches of space, it’s enough of a gap for riding over city streets, but it's too low to roll over curbs.

SPLACH Ranger Kickplate

Tires

As is common on scooters that are destined for reliable everyday use, the Ranger has adopted a varied approach to its tires.

SPLACH Ranger Tire

Leading from the front is an 8.5-inch air-filled tire that absorbs shocks and delivers oodles of traction for carving and turning. At the rear, you’ll find an 8-inch solid disk of rubber that ticks the low-maintenance box.

Rear tires bear more of your weight and as a result, are more susceptible to flats. So, by using a configuration that mixes the best of both worlds, the Ranger significantly reduces maintenance, whilst still benefiting from shock-absorbing capabilities.

SPLACH Ranger Rear Tire

Portability

The Ranger weighs a relatively hefty 45 lbs. You can hoist it on and off public transport without too much aggravation, but good luck carrying it up flights of stairs.

SPLACH Ranger Folded

That’s not to say that the Ranger isn’t compact, though. Thanks to its cantilevered folding mechanism, telescopic stem, and foldable handlebars, the entire frame collapses down to a size that makes it easy to store under an office desk or transport in the trunk of a car. For context, its folded dimensions measure just 42.9 (L) x 7.9 (W) x 15.7 (H) inches.

SPLACH Ranger Chassis Folded

It’s also worth noting that the telescopic stem allows you to adjust the height of the handlebars. The lowest setting measures just 30.6 inches from the deck, while the highest is 40.3 inches.

SPLACH Ranger Adjustable Stem Lever

On the topic of the handlebars, the cuffs that hold the foldable grips in place can occasionally come loose. Here, you need to re-twist them to tighten everything up (this takes a matter of seconds). It is, however, a small price to pay, since they offer a far more solid foundation than foldable handlebars that rely on spring-loaded cuffs (like those on the EMOVE Touring).

SPLACH Ranger Foldable Handlebars

The only improvement is if the cantilevered mechanism were to have a safety latch. This would add a layer of reassurance for when the stem is locked upright.

SPLACH Ranger Folding Lever

Load

Sporting the same frame as the SPLACH Turbo, the Ranger naturally shares the same load-bearing capacity. However, is it realistic to expect that riders of up to 265 lbs can successfully ride the Ranger? Based on my tests, it's not.

While testing the scooter I weighed 190 lbs and I found it slothlike. For optimal performance, I wouldn’t exceed 165 lbs.

Josh Standing on the SPLACH Ranger

Lights

The lighting rig certainly suits the rest of this scooter's sleek aesthetic, but does it have the substance for night rides? In some ways it does, and in others, it doesn’t.

SPLACH Ranger Lights

A strip light that runs up the stem works in tandem with two deck LEDs to illuminate the front of the scooter, while a couple of lights at the rear double up as flashing brake lights and turn signals.

This setup is perfectly adequate for ensuring your visibility to other road users, but what it’s not so good at is guaranteeing that you can see them. I suggest buying an extra clip-on headlight.

SPLACH Ranger Lights at Night

Build Quality

The level of build quality on show is what I would expect for a scooter of its price. To give you some perspective, its build is a match for scooters from VSETT but isn’t quite as high-end as those from NIU or Apollo.

SPLACH Ranger Sleek Frame

Nevertheless, it makes use of OEM components that have been designed for the mass market. Here, the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) – who, in this case, is Ningbo VSETT Intelligent Technology Co – makes the scooters for a range of companies – including SPLACH and VSETT – who then sell them under their own brand names.

SPLACH Ranger Narrow Stem

SPLACH does, however, leverage this to its advantage. By utilizing OEM manufacturing, they’re able to use economies of scale to sell their scooters at more affordable prices.

SPLACH Ranger Chassis

Results From Our Tests

Performance Report

Performance Report Summary

CategoryResult
Top Speed22 mph
0-15 MPH7.7 s
Max Range (Riding Slow)37 miles
Max Range (Riding Fast)24 miles
Braking2.6 meters
Max Incline6 degrees
Optimal InclineNone

Top Speed

With the Ranger’s focus on, well, range, its power in the speed department is limited.

Equipped with a small 36V 350W motor, it has a top speed of 22 mph. And, while I managed to reach the claimed top speed, it took an extremely long run to hit it.

Josh Riding the SPLACH Ranger

The size of the motor isn’t sufficient for propelling a 45 lbs scooter plus the weight of its rider. By comparison, scooters with the same size motors tend to be a lot lighter (31 lbs on average). This makes the Ranger 45% heavier than similarly powered models.

Top Speed vs Price

No surprises here: the Ranger’s top speed is surpassed by its more powerful siblings, the SPLACH Turbo and Turbo Plus. Both wield motors that benefit from 33% more torque (48V vs 36V) and 71% more wattage (600W vs 350W).

ScooterPriceTop Speed
SPLACH Turbo
$699
28 mph
SPLACH Turbo Plus
$899
26 mph
Emove Touring
$799
25 mph
Horizon 13
$799
23 mph
Horizon 10.4
$729
23 mph
SPLACH Ranger
$699
22 mph
INOKIM Light 2
$699
21 mph
NIU KQi3 Pro
$699.98
20 mph
Turboant V8
$569.98
20 mph
Turboant X7 Max
$449.98
20 mph
GoTrax G4
$449
20 mph
AnyHill UM-2
$899
19 mph
Fluid Cityrider
$399
18 mph
NIU KQi2 Pro
$559
17 mph
AnyHill UM-1
$599
16 mph

Similarly, while the EMOVE Touring and Horizon models have top speeds that are in a similar field of performance to the Ranger, both of these can call upon more powerful 48V 500W motors, meaning they’re able to reach their top speeds faster.

SPLACH Ranger Being Ridden

Acceleration

The Ranger’s acceleration stats do not paint a pretty picture. Measured against 14 other models in its price class, the 7.7 seconds it needs to go from 0-15 mph sees it take the wooden spoon.

ScooterPrice0-15 MPH
SPLACH Turbo
$699
4.3 s
Emove Touring
$799
4.5 s
AnyHill UM-2
$899
4.5 s
SPLACH Turbo Plus
$899
4.7 s
Horizon 13
$799
4.7 s
Horizon 10.4
$729
4.7 s
NIU KQi3 Pro
$699.98
5.0 s
INOKIM Light 2
$699
5.7 s
NIU KQi2 Pro
$559
6.0 s
Turboant V8
$569.98
6.3 s
GoTrax G4
$449
6.3 s
AnyHill UM-1
$599
6.8 s
Turboant X7 Max
$449.98
6.9 s
Fluid Cityrider
$399
7.3 s
SPLACH Ranger
$699
7.7 s

You can adjust the start strength from 1 to 5 via the p-settings, but frankly, it won’t make much difference. My tests were conducted in the strongest setting, and it still came last.

SPLACH Ranger Accelerating

Mileage

Armed with a big 36V 18.2Ah battery, it packs a maximum range of 37 miles, or 24 miles when factoring in real-world riding conditions.

As a result, it presents itself as an attractive choice. But, let's not forget that while it boasts a long range, getting from A to B takes an age.

SPLACH Ranger Charge Ports

Mileage vs Price

Compared to its 14 rivals, it performs noticeably better in the range stakes, taking second place behind the Turboant V8.

ScooterPriceMax Mileage
Turboant V8
$569.98
50 miles
SPLACH Ranger
$699
37 miles
SPLACH Turbo Plus
$899
33 miles
Emove Touring
$799
32 miles
Turboant X7 Max
$449.98
32 miles
NIU KQi3 Pro
$699.98
31 miles
Horizon 13
$799
30 miles
AnyHill UM-2
$899
28 miles
NIU KQi2 Pro
$559
25 miles
GoTrax G4
$449
25 miles
INOKIM Light 2
$699
24 miles
Horizon 10.4
$729
23 miles
SPLACH Turbo
$699
22 miles
AnyHill UM-1
$599
18.6 miles
Fluid Cityrider
$399
18 miles

However, because of its sluggish motor, it wouldn’t be my top choice for long-range rides. Neither would the Turboant V8. Despite having two batteries – one of which is detachable, meaning you can extend its range with spares – its build and ride quality, as well as motor power, are sub-par to the scooter in third place, the SPLACH Turbo Plus.

I, therefore, recommend the Turbo Plus if mileage is key to your priorities.

SPLACH Ranger Handlebars in Motion

Besides, when we dig deeper its superiority becomes even more clear. Sporting a 48V 15.6Ah battery it stores 14% more energy than the Ranger (749Wh vs 655Wh). Its battery is also 39% larger than that of the Turboant V8 (540Wh), which explains why it comes out victorious when we look at real-world performance data.

ScooterPriceReal-World Mileage
SPLACH Turbo Plus
$899
26 miles
Turboant V8
$569.98
25 miles
SPLACH Ranger
$699
24 miles
Horizon 13
$799
23 miles
NIU KQi3 Pro
$699.98
22 miles
Emove Touring
$799
19 miles
AnyHill UM-2
$899
19 miles
SPLACH Turbo
$699
18 miles
Turboant X7 Max
$449.98
18 miles
Horizon 10.4
$729
17 miles
NIU KQi2 Pro
$559
17 miles
INOKIM Light 2
$699
16 miles
GoTrax G4
$449
14 miles
AnyHill UM-1
$599
13 miles
Fluid Cityrider
$399
13 miles

Hill Climbing

The less said about the Ranger’s hill-climbing capabilities, the better.

It simply has no head for heights, struggling with even the gentlest of inclines. There isn’t even an optimal gradient that I can give it.

SPLACH Ranger Frame

Shock Absorption

The Ranger’s performance report hasn’t exactly cast it in the best light so far, but here’s where it begins to claw back some credibility.

SPLACH Ranger Rear Spring

That’s because, along with the Turbo, it’s the only scooter under $700 to feature swingarm suspension.

SPLACH Ranger Front Swingarm

The swingarms allow for a deep amount of travel, while the springs are well calibrated and don’t bottom out.

Josh Jumping on the SPLACH Ranger

Braking

Braking is another area of strength. The Ranger is again forging new ground in the sub-$700 category by being one of only two scooters (the other being, you guessed it, the Turbo) to come armed with dual drum brakes. The rest rely on single mechanical brakes.

SPLACH Ranger Drum Brake

Working in tandem with the electronic braking system, the drums will bring you to a safe stop from 15 mph in an impressive 2.6 meters.

If you find that the braking setup isn’t quite working for you, then you can tighten or loosen the drums by twisting the nuts at the end of the brake lines.

Additionally, you can adjust the electronic braking strength from 0-2 via the p-settings – I had it on the strongest setting, which was 2.

SPLACH Ranger Handgrip

Ride Quality

Ride quality can be measured in two facets: handling and comfort. And, while the Ranger certainly has both areas covered, it would be remiss of me to say that it has good ride quality without factoring in the sluggish response of its motor.

After all, you can’t fully enjoy what the scooter has to offer when you’re riding at a snail's pace.

SPLACH Ranger Colorful Frame

Compare With Other Scooters

Alternatives

SPLACH Turbo

SPLACH Turbo

Sale: $699.00 $1,299.00 – Get Extra $65 Off With Code: ESI

Specs:

Why is it Better Than the SPLACH Ranger?

Why is it Worse Than the SPLACH Ranger?

SPLACH Turbo Plus

SPLACH Turbo Plus

Sale: $899.00 $1,399.00 – Get Extra $65 Off With Code: ESI

Specs:

Why is it Better Than the SPLACH Ranger?

Why is it Worse Than the SPLACH Ranger?

Horizon V2

Horizon 13

Sale: $799.00 $979.00

Specs:

Why is it Better Than the SPLACH Ranger?

Why is it Worse Than the SPLACH Ranger?

Post-Purchase Support

Warranty

SPLACH scooters are covered by a 6-month warranty, which admittedly pales in comparison to the 12 and 24-month warranties offered by rival brands.

Components that are covered include the throttle, card reader, charger, controller, battery, framework, and motor.

SPLACH Ranger Telescopic Stem

As expected, the warranty doesn’t cover issues caused by mishandling, accidents, abuse, dangerous play, or negligence. Damage resulting from weather, and normal wear and tear isn’t covered, either.

Manufacturer Specs

Specification Sheet

Specification: SPLACH Ranger Review

Brand
Brand

SPLACH

Type
Terrain

Street

Design
Portability

Folding Frame, Folding Handlebars

Weight (lbs)

45

Rider Weight (lbs)

265

Tire Size (inches)

8.5

Tire Type

Pneumatic (Inner-Tube), Solid (Rubber)

Performance
Top Speed (mph)

22

Max Range (miles)

37

Charge Time (hours)

12

Suspension Type

Front & Rear

Brake Type

Drum, Electronic

Extra Features
Extra Features

Cruise Control, Lights, Water Resistance Rating, Adjustable Handlebar Height, Turn Signals

Specification
Max Incline (degrees)

6

Water Resistance Rating

IPX5

Where to Buy:*

*Offers displayed are from retailers that we trust. If only one offer is available this is because they are the only retailer we recommend. To support our rigorous scooter review and editorial process, we rely on affiliate commissions. These are at no cost to you. Our work is independent and impartial. Read more here.

Specification: SPLACH Ranger Review

Brand
Brand

SPLACH

Type
Terrain

Street

Design
Portability

Folding Frame, Folding Handlebars

Weight (lbs)

45

Rider Weight (lbs)

265

Tire Size (inches)

8.5

Tire Type

Pneumatic (Inner-Tube), Solid (Rubber)

Performance
Top Speed (mph)

22

Max Range (miles)

37

Charge Time (hours)

12

Suspension Type

Front & Rear

Brake Type

Drum, Electronic

Extra Features
Extra Features

Cruise Control, Lights, Water Resistance Rating, Adjustable Handlebar Height, Turn Signals

Specification
Max Incline (degrees)

6

Water Resistance Rating

IPX5

SPLACH Ranger Review
SPLACH Ranger Review

$699.00

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