- 11% Josh Testing the Varla Eagle One V2 in Woods
Josh Testing the Varla Eagle One V2 On a Dirt Track Josh Testing the Varla Eagle One V2 Handling Varla Eagle One V2 Motor Varla Eagle One V2 Deck Varla Eagle One V2 Cockpit Varla Eagle One V2 Lights

Varla Eagle One V2 Review

$1,599.00

8/10 (Expert Score)

DATE

February 29, 2024

Price When Reviewed: $1599.00

Sequels are risky business. They can, at times, be cynical money-grabs devoid of adding any real value. Thankfully, the Varla Eagle One V2 is not one of those.

 

Taking the baton passed on to it by its predecessor – the Eagle One – the V2 is essentially an entirely new scooter. Aside from its redesigned frame, it now comes with a 14% bigger battery, more efficient Sine Wave controllers, a superior thumb throttle, a brighter lighting rig, an improved display, a stronger twist-action folding mechanism, and larger, more robust tires.

 

In fact, the only features that have remained in place are the 52V 1000W motors, dual hydraulic brakes, and the battery management system.

 

For you, this translates into a scooter that’s jam-packed with value. Taking its place alongside other popular performance models – including the Apollo Ghost, SPLACH Titan, and Mantis V2 – the Varla Eagle One V2 makes its mark as one of the best entry-level dual-motor models on the market.

Varla Eagle One V2 Review: Affordable Dual-Motor Scooter For All-Terrain Adventures

The good and the bad

Who we recommend it for

Is it worth its price tag?

Look, feel, and functionality

Results from our tests

Other scooters to consider

The Good and The Bad

Pros & Cons

PROS:

  • Top contender in its price class
  • Packed full of features
  • Extremely well-rounded performance
  • Great value for money
  • Powerful, yet tameable
  • All-terrain powerhouse
  • Plush suspension that’s primed for differing terrain
  • Handling, control, and maneuverability are all assured
  • Throttle response is super smooth thanks to the Sine Wave controllers
  • Rock-solid stem thanks to super secure folding mechanism
  • Suitable for tall and heavy riders
  • Large, bright, and easy-to-read display
  • NFC card reader for enhanced security
  • Lights are sufficient for night rides
  • Sharp and responsive dual hydraulic brakes
  • IP54 water resistance rating

CONS:

  • The deck is short, but the well-designed kickplate adds an extra 5.1 inches of space
  • The grip tape quickly becomes dirty and is hard to clean

Varla Eagle One V2 Deck Lights
Is It Right For You?

Who It's Best For

The Varla Eagle One V2 has been positioned as the perfect gateway into the world of fast, all-terrain electric scooters. Does it achieve this lofty claim? Without a doubt.

Varla Eagle One V2 Frame

Not only is it powerful and packed full of features, but thanks to its well-calibrated suspension and hybrid tires, it seamlessly transitions from street to off-road routes without so much as a flinch. This is a scooter that thrives in both the city and the wild.

Josh Testing the Varla Eagle One V2 Ride Quality

It’s not out of reach for new riders, either. While it boasts an adrenaline-worthy top speed, it’s a welcoming beast that’s easily tamed.

Then there’s its inclusivity. Thanks to its 41.3-inch deck-to-handlebar height and 330 lb load-bearing capacity, it’s suitable for both tall and heavy riders. Varla states that it’s suitable for those up to 6’11”, though I think that’s a bit of a stretch – from my experience, I’d say 6’4” is the maximum height before you need to crouch.

Varla Eagle One V2 Griptape

Is It Worth Its Price Tag?

Value For Money

Just one look at the Varla Eagle One V2’s real-world performance results is enough to qualify it as a scooter worth its salt.

Josh Testing the Varla Eagle One V2 On a Dirt Track

If it's the speed that you crave, you’ve got it. Long range? Tick. Hill-climbing prowess? Sorted. Everyday durability, responsive brakes, and top-of-its-class ride quality? You’re covered. Rarely do you find a model that’s so capable in so many areas for such a price.

Further Information:

Best Cheap Electric Scooters

Look, Feel & Functionality

Design & Features

Cockpit

The first thing I noticed after unboxing the Eagle One V2 was its swept-back handlebars. This design – which is more pronounced than what I saw on the V1 – promotes a strong sense of control when going through the gears. Add to the fact that the handlebars stretch a considerably wide 28 inches, and you have a scooter that’s a dream to handle.

Varla Eagle One V2 Cockpit

I was also delighted to find that a far more ergonomic thumb throttle had replaced the finger throttle found on its predecessor, while the new 3.5-inch display is a big improvement on the more basic QS-S4 unit. Another significant upgrade comes in the form of the NFC card reader, which takes the place of the old key-lock ignition.

Unlocking the Varla Eagle One V2 With NFC Card

Factor in an improved button pad that grants you access to a host of p-settings and riding modes, and you have a cockpit that’s superior to what came before it in every conceivable way.

And, unlike some of its all-terrain competitors – here’s looking at you, Nanrobot D6+ 2.0 – it saves your preferred p-settings, meaning that you don’t have to re-enter them when turning the scooter back on.

Varla Eagle One V2 Button Console

Frame

One look at this beast and it’s easy to see that this scooter has been built to weather the storms of everyday rugged use. Just take its composition, for example. Constructed from a 6061 aluminum alloy – the same material used in heavy-duty structural applications like truck frames, rail coaches, and bridges – the V2 not only benefits from a high tensile strength but also excellent corrosion resistance.

Varla Eagle One V2 Durable Frame

Together, these lay the foundation for it to achieve its all-terrain, all-weather appeal – a quality further strengthened by its IP54 water-resistance rating which protects it against the ingress of both moisture and dust.

So profound are the differences in the V2’s frame compared to the original V1, that I’d say it has more in common with the Varla Eagle One Pro.

Varla Eagle One V2 Chassis

Deck

With just 16.1 x 7.7 inches of usable space, the deck is responsible for one of my few grumbles: it’s a little on the short side.

Varla Eagle One V2 Deck

The presence of the kickplate does alleviate these concerns somewhat, given that it provides an extra 5.1 inches of space and is angled at a comfortable 16 degrees. But, the reality is that without using the kickplate, your feet can feel a little cramped.

Varla Eagle One V2 Kickplate

This minor foible aside, I was pleased to find that it comes with three replaceable grip tapes. This is a nice touch, as they quickly become dirty and are hard to clean; the V2 can look a little scruffy as a result, so it’s good to have a quick fix up your sleeve.

Varla Eagle One V2 Replaceable Grip Tapes

Tires

While the 10 x 3.0-inch inner tube tires of the original performed admirably, they were susceptible to pinch flats and punctures. These threats have been squashed with the V2’s new tubeless beauties, which are 0.5 inches wider for added stability.

Varla Eagle One V2 Tire

Now also sporting an all-terrain tread pattern, they deliver more traction while traversing loose surfaces.

Varla Eagle One V2 Off-Road Tire

Portability

Weighing 82 lbs, it hasn’t been made to whet the appetites of those searching for a lightweight scooter – we are, after all, talking about a robust dual-motor model, so its hefty build is to be expected.

Varla Eagle One V2 Folded From Above

What might pique your interest, though, is its folding mechanism. Gone are the dual collar clamps that would loosen mid-ride to make the V1’s stem feel rickety; in their place is a much stronger twist-action contraption and grenade-style pin that locks everything into place.

Josh Testing the Varla Eagle One V2 Safety Folding Pin

The mechanism, which looks like an oversized thumbtack, screws into two grooves – one above and one below the folding point. Once tightened, it guarantees stability – as evidenced by my tests where I exerted a lot of pulling and pushing force on the handlebars while navigating unpredictable off-road terrain.

Varla Eagle One V2 Wide Handlebars

It’s also worth noting that I found the stem a little stiff to fold. This, however, is a positive attribute of its design, as it reinforces its rock-solid, wobble-free build.

Varla Eagle One V2 Folded

Once I managed to collapse the stem, the hook on the back of the handlebars conveniently latched to the metal bar protruding from the kickplate. If there was one area for improvement, though, it would be that the spring clip on the hook wasn’t the most effective or well-designed. On several occasions, the clip would pop out of the hook leaving it limp.

Varla Eagle One V2 Folding Hook Latch to Kickplate

Load

Varla claims that the Eagle One V2 can support riders up to 330 lbs, while they recommend not exceeding 265 lbs.

Based on my experience, I weighed 197 lbs while testing the V2, and it performed well. Considering its motor and battery power, it gets my seal of approval as a top contender for heavier riders.

Josh Testing the Varla Eagle One V2 Load Capacity

Lights

Considering that the original Eagle One was void of a headlight, the addition of the V2’s high-mounted unit is a vast improvement. Not only is big, bright, and well-positioned, but it illuminates enough of the way ahead so that you don’t need to fork out any extra on additional clip-on lights.

Varla Eagle One V2 Headlight Beam

Elsewhere, the dual deck-embedded taillights boost your visibility to others, while they also function as brake lights.

Varla Eagle One V2 Lights

Completing the lighting rig is a set of colorful strip lights that line both sides of the deck. Using the minus button on the control pad you can choose between 3 modes – breathing, flashing, and streaming. They aren’t quite as bright as those featured on the Mantis V2, but they do add a dash of flair nonetheless.

Varla Eagle One V2 Deck LEDs

Build Quality

Aside from the loose spring clip that’s supposed to keep the handlebars locked to the deck when folded, there’s little to pick at when it comes to assessing the Eagle One V2’s build quality.

Varla Eagle One V2 Folding Hook

Sure, it may not be the most elegant scooter, and yes, it may be a little bulky, but this is a veritable juggernaut that gets the job done. Not only is its craftsmanship on par with the titan of the performance scooter world – the coveted Mantis V2 – but it’s far superior to its closely-priced all-terrain rival, the Nanrobot D6+ 2.0.

Josh Testing the Varla Eagle One V2

Further Information:

How I Test Build Quality

Results From My Tests

Performance Report

Performance Report Summary

  • Tester: Josh Frisby | Weight: 197 lbs | Height: 6'1″
  • Equipment: Dragy GPS Performance Box (DG70) | Garmin Edge 130 Plus
  • Results: See the test data
CategoryTest ResultsClaimed
Top Speed36.1 mph40 mph
0-15 MPH2.3 sn/a
0-20 MPH3.8 sn/a
0-25 MPH5.8 sn/a
0-30 MPH9.3 sn/a
Braking2.0 metersn/a
Range24.4 miles42 miles
Incline18 degrees30 degrees

Josh Testing the Varla Eagle One V2 Off Road

Top Speed

  • Tester: Josh Frisby | Weight: 197 lbs | Height: 6'1″
  • Equipment: Garmin Edge 130 Plus
  • Results: See the test data

With its dual 52V 1000W motors revving at full force, Varla claims that the Eagle One V2 can reach a top speed of 40 mph.

Based on my tests, using a high-precision GPS data logger, I was only able to clock 36.1 mph.

Varla Eagle One V2 Top Speed Test Data From High-Precision GPS Data Logger

Top Speed vs Price

On the face of it, the Eagle One V2’s stats make for good reading, with the top spot secured alongside the V1, Mantis V2, and Nanrobot D6+ 2.0.

ScooterTop Speed
Varla Eagle One V2
$1,599
40 mph
Varla Eagle One
$1,499
40 mph
Mantis V2
$1,599
40 mph
Nanrobot D6+ 2.0
$1,549
40 mph
SPLACH Titan
$1,399
37 mph
Apollo Ghost 2022
$1,449
37 mph
Apollo City Pro
$1,699
32 mph

However, while it may be a top contender in its price class, we do need to bear in mind the results from my tests. This becomes even more evident in the acceleration report where the rankings shift.

Josh Testing the Varla Eagle One V2 Top Speed

Acceleration

  • Tester: Josh Frisby | Weight: 197 lbs | Height: 6'1″
  • Equipment: Dragy GPS Performance Box (DG70)
  • Results: See the test data

The V2’s acceleration rate is perhaps a more accurate reflection of where it ranks amongst its similarly priced competitors.

Josh Testing the Varla Eagle One V2 Acceleration

While the addition of its superior Sine Wave controllers and ergonomic thumb throttle nudge it in front of the V1 with a 0-15 mph rate of 2.3 seconds and 0-25 mph in 5.8 seconds, these stats show that the scooter loses ground on other rivals as it moves through the gears.

Scooter0-15 MPH
Mantis V2
$1,599
2.1 s
Varla Eagle One V2
$1,599
2.3 s
Apollo City Pro
$1,699
2.3 s
Nanrobot D6+ 2.0
$1,549
2.4 s
SPLACH Titan
$1,399
2.5 s
Apollo Ghost 2022
$1,449
2.5 s
Varla Eagle One
$1,499
2.8 s

Despite maintaining its top-performing status with a second-place finish to 15 mph – where it's beaten only by the more powerful Mantis V2 and its potent 60V 1000W motors – the Eagle One V2 is toppled by four peers when focusing on 25 mph.

Scooter0-25 MPH
Mantis V2
$1,599
4.7 s
SPLACH Titan
$1,399
4.9 s
Nanrobot D6+ 2.0
$1,549
5.1 s
Apollo Ghost 2022
$1,449
5.3 s
Varla Eagle One V2
$1,599
5.8 s
Apollo City Pro
$1,699
6.1 s
Varla Eagle One
$1,499
6.2 s

Interestingly, the much cheaper SPLACH Titan is one of those peers. Despite sharing the same motor power, a considerably lighter net weight sees it surge ahead with a rate of 4.9 seconds (to be precise, it’s 14 lbs – or 17% – lighter).

Further Information:

How I Test Acceleration

Mileage

  • Tester: Josh Frisby | Weight: 197 lbs | Height: 6'1″
  • Equipment: Garmin Edge 130 Plus
  • Results: See the test data

One of the biggest upgrades that the V2 has over its predecessor is its 14% bigger battery (52V 20.8Ah 1082Wh vs 52V 18.2Ah 946Wh).

Unsurprisingly, this translates into an increased maximum range of 42 miles, though my tests revealed that its real-world range was 24.37 miles.

Varla Eagle One V2 Real-World Range Test Data From High-Precision GPS Data Logger

Here, it’s important to note that while testing the scooter I weighed 197 lbs, maintained an average moving speed of 17.9 mph, and climbed a total of 1,063 ft. It was also a very cold day with an average temperature of 37.8 °F (3.2 °C). This could have sapped the battery of its efficiency – especially considering that the ideal operating temperature of an electric scooter battery is 70.7 °F (21.5 °C).

You’ll also be pleased to hear that a smart battery management system is in place to protect the unit from damage when in use.

Varla Eagle One V2 Charging Ports

Mileage vs Price

It’s another podium-position finish for the V2 when it comes to maximum range.

ScooterMax Range
SPLACH Titan
$1,399
44 miles
Apollo City Pro
$1,699
43 miles
Varla Eagle One V2
$1,599
42 miles
Varla Eagle One
$1,499
40 miles
Nanrobot D6+ 2.0
$1,549
40 miles
Apollo Ghost 2022
$1,449
39 miles
Mantis V2
$1,599
33 miles

Its real-world performance is also in line with its rivals, which makes sense, considering that its 1082Wh battery aligns with the 1066Wh average of its 6 similarly-priced competitors.

Josh Testing the Varla Eagle One V2 Real-World Range

Hill Climbing

  • Tester: Josh Frisby | Weight: 197 lbs | Height: 6'1″
  • Equipment: Garmin Edge 130 Plus

What does 3200W of peak power give you? A certified hill climbing machine – that’s what!

It flew up my 10% hill grade test with ease and had enough power to take steeper inclines in its stride.

Josh Testing the Varla Eagle One V2 Hill Climbing

Shock Absorption

  • Tester: Josh Frisby | Weight: 197 lbs | Height: 6'1″
  • Equipment: Subjective Assessment

With two huge springs and dual sweeping swingarms at either end of the chassis, the V2’s shock-absorbing capabilities are among its most impressive features.

Varla Eagle One V2 Front Spring

Add to this 5.1 inches of ground clearance, and it’s perfectly geared for off-roading. The springs also didn't clank or bottom out despite jumping up and down on the deck during my tests (the same can’t said for some of its competitors – I’m looking at you, Apollo Ghost).

Josh Testing the Varla Eagle One V2 Shock Absorption

With all things considered – including the rebound and compression rates, the balance of shock absorption across the front and rear of the scooter, and the amount of travel that the swingarms and suspension provided – I scored it a solid 8/10 on the shock absorption scale (where 1 was extremely stiff and 10 was extremely soft).

Varla Eagle One V2 Suspension

Braking

  • Tester: Josh Frisby | Weight: 197 lbs | Height: 6'1″
  • Equipment: Measuring Tape

Wow. Take a bow, Varla. Armed with dual hydraulic calipers, heat-dissipating 160 mm rotors, and an electronic braking system, the Eagle One V2 brought me to a thudding stop from 15 mph in an exceptional 2.0 meters. This is top-tier performance.

Varla Eagle One V2 Hydraulic Brake Caliper

It’s worth pointing out that the strength of the electronic brakes can be dialed up or down between 0 and 2, depending on your preferences. My tests were conducted on the strongest setting, which was 2.

Varla Eagle One V2 Brake

Ride Quality

  • Tester: Josh Frisby | Weight: 197 lbs | Height: 6'1″
  • Equipment: Subjective Assessment

When I assess ride quality, I like to judge a scooter across three key areas: handling, comfort, and power delivery. So, with this in mind, let’s dissect how the Varla Eagle One V2 fared.

Josh Testing the Varla Eagle One V2 Range

First up, we have handling. While the V2’s expansive handlebars and easy-to-reach controls certainly set the foundation for control, the two defining factors that elevate its prowess are its 9-degree rake angle and well-balanced frame. Here, the V2 affords the dimensions, geometry, and build to inspire confidence. The rake angle hits the sweet spot between stability and maneuverability, while the stem, chassis, and everything in between, is perfectly balanced with an even distribution of weight.

Josh Testing the Varla Eagle One V2 Handling

Next, we have comfort. Now, it’s no surprise that I think the deck would benefit from being longer, but with the accompanying kickplate, it’s easy to let this minor gripe slide. Besides, its shock-absorbing credentials and juicy tires promise a riding experience that remains comfortable. I rode it for 1 hour, 22 minutes, and 55 seconds while completing the range test, and could have easily kept going if the battery persisted. This may not seem like a long duration, but trust me when I say that it can, at times, be extremely taxing when attempting to complete range tests on scooters that aren’t as well-equipped as the V2.

Varla Eagle One V2 Motor

Last on the list is power delivery. Here, the 25A Sine Wave controllers are the jewel in the V2’s ride quality crown. Their ability to funnel power can be likened to a roll-on/roll-off dimmer dial that gradually increases and decreases the brightness of a light bulb. The same smooth-flowing pattern of power is generated by the controllers, resulting in a throttle response that feels refined and controllable, as opposed to jerky and abrupt.

Varla Eagle One V2 Thumb Throttle

Further Information:

How I Test Ride Quality

Compare With Other Scooters

Alternatives

Mantis V2

Sale: $1,599.00 $1,899.00 – Get Extra $100 Off With Code: ESI100
Josh Testing the Mantis V2

Performance Report:

Tester: Josh Frisby (190 lbs, 6.1 ft)

*Based on my tests and assessments

Why is it Better Than the Varla Eagle One V2?

Why is it Worse Than the Varla Eagle One V2?

SPLACH Titan

Sale: $1,399.00 $2,499.00 – Get Extra $65 Off With Code: ESI
Josh Testing the SPLACH Titan

Performance Report:

Tester: Josh Frisby (190 lbs, 6.1 ft)

*Based on my tests and assessments

Why is it Better Than the Varla Eagle One V2?

Why is it Worse Than the Varla Eagle One V2?

Apollo City Pro

Sale: $1,699.00 $1,799.00 – Get Extra $50 Off With Code: ESI
Josh Testing the Apollo City Pro

Performance Report:

Tester: Josh Frisby (190 lbs, 6.1 ft)

*Based on my tests and assessments

Why is it Better Than the Varla Eagle One V2?

Why is it Worse Than the Varla Eagle One V2?

Post-Purchase Support

Warranty

The Varla Eagle One V2 is covered by a 2-year warranty, which is longer than the warranties offered by many other brands and retailers. This only encompasses the throttle, frame, display, and controllers, however.

Varla Eagle One V2 On Dirt Track

The motors, battery, and charger, on the other hand, are covered by a 12-month warranty, while the brake pads, kickstand, and fenders are subject to a 1-month warranty.

As to be expected, the warranty only covers manufacturing defects. Issues caused by accidental damage, wear and tear, or misuse are not claimable.

Manufacturer Specs

Specification Sheet

Specification: Varla Eagle One V2 Review

Brand
Brand

Varla

Type
Terrain

Off-Road, Street

Design
Portability

Folding Frame

Weight (lbs)

82

Rider Weight (lbs)

330

Tire Size (inches)

10

Tire Type

Pneumatic (Tubeless)

Performance
Top Speed (mph)

40

Max Range (miles)

42

Charge Time (hours)

10

Suspension Type

Front & Rear

Brake Type

Disc (Full-Hydraulic), Electronic

Extra Features
Extra Features

Add-On Seat, Cruise Control, Lights, Water Resistance Rating, Dual Motors

Specification
Max Incline (degrees)

30

Water Resistance Rating

IP54

Where to Buy:*

*Offers displayed are from retailers that we trust. If only one offer is available this is because they are the only retailer we recommend. To support our rigorous scooter review and editorial process, we rely on affiliate commissions. These are at no cost to you. Our work is independent and impartial. Read more here.

Specification: Varla Eagle One V2 Review

Brand
Brand

Varla

Type
Terrain

Off-Road, Street

Design
Portability

Folding Frame

Weight (lbs)

82

Rider Weight (lbs)

330

Tire Size (inches)

10

Tire Type

Pneumatic (Tubeless)

Performance
Top Speed (mph)

40

Max Range (miles)

42

Charge Time (hours)

10

Suspension Type

Front & Rear

Brake Type

Disc (Full-Hydraulic), Electronic

Extra Features
Extra Features

Add-On Seat, Cruise Control, Lights, Water Resistance Rating, Dual Motors

Specification
Max Incline (degrees)

30

Water Resistance Rating

IP54

Varla Eagle One V2 Review
Varla Eagle One V2 Review

$1,599.00

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